Good Night, Sleep Tight Little One

Did you know that children who are adopted are more likely to experience sleep disorders? If your adopted child is having difficulty sleeping, it may help to ensure them that they are not alone. 25% of children experience sleep disorders and even more children who have been adopted experience such sleep disorders. This increase is likely since adopted children are at risk for psychosocial stressors, behavioral problems, and attachment issues. The transition period into a new family can be particularly taxing on your little one.

It was recently discovered that there was no significant relationship between sleep disorders and the family structure or adoption history. Therefore, do not be discouraged if your adopted child is having difficulty sleeping. They are not alone, you are not alone. All you can do is try to help them adjust to the transition of the adoption process and be there as a steady sense of support and encouragement along the way. If your child is having recurring nightmares that wake them up, you may want to have the child see a counselor, psychologist, or coach who specializes in trauma specific care. These recurring nightmares may be a sign of Post-Traumatic Stress which can be treated and healed with the appropriate care and attention.

For more information visit: ttp://www.mdpi.com/2227-9067/4/9/77/pdf 

Recent Study Shows the Importance of Faith in the Lives of Foster Children

Too often I hear stories of people who walk away from faith because of a traumatic experience.  When I hear this, it breaks my heart. However, today I was pleasantly surprised and encouraged as I read the outcome of a recent study. The study examined the faith of 188 children in the foster care system.  Face-to-face interviews revealed 95% of youth believe in God, over 70% believe God is ‘creator’ and God is ‘love’, and 79% considered prayer a spiritual practice. Over half responded to tragic experiences by praying (59%). The youth’s top three spiritual goals were to follow God’s plan for them, become a better person, and know their purpose in life.

It is true, what the Bible states in Psalm 34:18 that “The Lord is close to the brokenhearted and saves those who are crushed in spirit.” This study has instigated a revived push to integrate spirituality into the practice and care-giving for youth in foster care. The door is open to us Christians. Are we willing to step up and welcome these children into our homes, so that we can help them grow in faith, love, and understanding?

For more information:

Exploring Spirituality Among Youth in Foster Care: Findings from the Casey Field Office Mental Health Study. By Jackson, Lovie J. White, Catherine Roller. O’Brien, Kirk. DiLorenzo, Paul. Cathcart, Ernie. Wolf, Mary. Bruskas, Delilah. Pecora, Peter J. Nix-Early, Vivian. Cabrera, Jorge.

Available From:www.wiley.com